Shin Pain Treatment Perth


Do you suffer from painful shins?
You must read what our podiatrists have to say…

Description:

Patello-femoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS) is a common knee problem that is believed to be related to the contact area between the kneecap (called the ‘patella’) and the thigh bone (called the‘femur’).

Incidence:

The cause of pain and dysfunction often results from either abnormal forces or prolonged repetitive compressive or shearing forces (running or jumping) on the patello-femoral joint. As a result, specific populations at high risk of primary PFPS include runners, basketball players, young athletes and females especially those who have an increased angle of the knees (otherwise known as ‘genu-valgum’ or ‘knock-knees’). PFPS is one of the most common knee dysfunctions among physically active young women.

Causes and contributing factors:

Although the exact cause of PFPS is unknown, it is typically related to the way the kneecap moves on the groove of your thigh bone. In each case of PFPS, there are often multiple contributing factors causing the knee pain:

  • Extrinsic risk factors:
  • Surface used for running or physical activity practice
  • Volume and intensity of training
  • Shoes
  • Intrinsic risk factors:
  • Anatomic alterations in the femoral region
  • Weakness and/or imbalance of the quadriceps muscles
  • Peri-patellar soft-tissue tightness
  • Foot mechanics such as excessive and/or prolonged pronation

Symptoms:

People with PFPS will feel pain under and around the kneecap. The pain is often exacerbated by sports, walking, sitting for a long time, or stair climbing. Descending stairs is often more painful than ascending. Unless there is an underlying pathology in the knee, swelling is usually mild to nil.  Pain can present in only one knee, or you can have pain in both knees.

Treatment:

  • Reduction in high impact physical activities
  • Icing and anti-inflammatory medication
  • Patellar taping/bracing
  • Muscle release
  • Muscle stretching and strengthening programs
  • Patellar mobilizations
  • Acupuncture/Dry needling
  • Foot strapping and orthotic therapy
  • Appropriate footwear